“Westernization” of the Russian Culture of the Second-Half of the 17th century in the Light of the Theory of the Cultural Transfer
“Westernization” of the Russian Culture of the Second-Half of the 17th century in the Light of the Theory of the Cultural Transfer
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The article examines the possibility of applying the theory of cultural transfer to the analysis of the mechanisms of the “westernization” of the Russian culture of the second-half of the 17th century. The Russian culture mastered the West European ideas, values and subjects through the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. This process was activated after the Russian-Polish war 1654—1667, finished by the conjoining of the left-bank Ukraine to Russia. Tsar Aleksey Mikhaylovich and its entourage made the realized selection in the favor of the Europeanization of the country. The transfer of the western culture through orthodox cultures of the eastern realms of the Ukraine and Belorussia softened the modernization resonance. As a result, “westernization” connected the history of Russia with the history of European world much stronger than it seems at a first glance and facilitated perception of Peter the Great cultural reforms by the population.
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Liudmila Sukina
Program Systems Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences
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